Wednesday, 5 April 2017

Tea Plantation in Malawi (Part 2)

On Monday I showed you some of the images I took when I was with the bird guide in Malawi of the Tea Plantation, CLICK HERE if you missed that. Yesterday I showed you an interesting VIDEO of one of the birds I saw and today, I continue with my shots in the Tea Plantation.  I can tell you although we stared at 6.00am it was extremely hot and perhaps next week I will show you (if I am brave enough), what happened to me  when I returned to the Cottage where I was staying for the weekend!!!  











Many thanks for your visit and also your comments.

10 comments:

  1. Working in that heat wouldn't be pleasant. You have me intrigued about your cottage 'mishap' (if mishap it was).

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  2. Everything is so very beautifully GREEN! They are dressed in so many layers, and should be wearing shorts and tank tops. Goodness, even the men are overdressed. Now I am curious what happened to you upon your return!

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  3. Wonderful scenes from another part of the world. It's interesting to see.

    Mersad
    Mersad Donko Photography

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  4. I drink a lot of tea. It is very interesting to see how it is grown and harvested. Thanks!

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  5. Your shots are just beautiful and I love seeing the colorful workers in the fields. Their lives must be so difficult, and yet their smiles are so joyous. I hope nothing too difficult happened to you afterward. Iced tea on the cottage terrace???? Will be watching! Happy day to you Margaret!!

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  6. All that hard work so I can enjoy an occasional cup of tea.

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  7. Nice to see these. Thanks.

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  8. Very colourful scenes. The work looks back breaking.

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  9. The photos leave me with so many questions. Are the leaves picked when at a specific growth? How frequently are the leaves harvested? Looks like time for some googling! I am from cotton farming country back in the days before mechanization of the harvest. The photos are reminiscent of the harvest time. The majority of the pickers my folks hired to help pick the cotton were black. My older sisters, Mom and Dad would be in the fields in the heat along side the hired hands. They would drag the long cotton sacks as the stooped over picking the cotton. Very, very hard work.

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